From Nicola di Maestro Antonio to Carlo Crivelli and back again: One Hundred and One Years of Art History

  by Amanda Hilliam The only article dedicated to the Venetian painter Carlo Crivelli (c.1430/5 – c.1494) ever to appear in The Burlington Magazine was published in March 1913.[1] The attribution to Crivelli of a newly-discovered Madonna and Child (fig.1)., which had recently passed from Duveen Brothers to the Philip Lehman collection in New York, … Continue reading From Nicola di Maestro Antonio to Carlo Crivelli and back again: One Hundred and One Years of Art History

‘Caravaggiomania’ in The Burlington Magazine, part II: 1903-1951

by Noti Klagka  This blog focuses on articles published on Caravaggio in The Burlington Magazine before the 1951 Milan exhibition organized by Roberto Longhi, which transformed Caravaggio studies. As illustrated in the previous blog, during the second half of the twentieth century, the Burlington contributed much to the shaping of Caravaggio’s oeuvre by paying close … Continue reading ‘Caravaggiomania’ in The Burlington Magazine, part II: 1903-1951

Potted Histories: the Omega Workshops adverts campaign in The Burlington Magazine, 1913-1919

Alexis Clark, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History and Visual Culture at Denison University (Ohio), is currently researching on Fry and the Omega Workshops. This fascinating and thoroughly researched piece is an excerpt from her forthcoming work, and it has been written exclusively for the Burlington Index Blog.  Clark’s discussion of the Omega Workshops’ advertisements in The … Continue reading Potted Histories: the Omega Workshops adverts campaign in The Burlington Magazine, 1913-1919

‘I’ll give the magazine £100 and you can do what you dam [sic] well please with it’, Lockett Agnew advertises in The Burlington Magazine

In its years of operation as an independently funded publication the Burlington has often needed to seek private sponsorship, right from the times of its inception in 1903 and throughout its history.[1] The challenge was, then as now, how to gain financial support without relinquishing the journal’s intellectual independence. The Burlington (which has run as Charitable … Continue reading ‘I’ll give the magazine £100 and you can do what you dam [sic] well please with it’, Lockett Agnew advertises in The Burlington Magazine

Anarchy and art dealing in Paris: Robert Dell (1865-1940), first Editor of The Burlington Magazine.

Roger Fry is famously associated with the inception of The Burlington Magazine, but credit must also be given to its first Editor, Robert Dell [photographed here]. A Christian socialist writer in London, then Anarchist art dealer in Paris, and finally exiled political journalist in America, Dell’s life was lived outside a conventional professional path and … Continue reading Anarchy and art dealing in Paris: Robert Dell (1865-1940), first Editor of The Burlington Magazine.

The soul thief: John Singer Sargent and the Burlington Magazine

This year is the 90th anniversary of John Singer Sargent’s death and the National Portrait Gallery of London commemorated him with an exhibition, Sargent. Portraits of artists and friends, curated by Richard Ormond. This show is a journey across Sargent’s personal and artistic life, through which the intense rapport between the painter and his sitters … Continue reading The soul thief: John Singer Sargent and the Burlington Magazine

The Burlington Magazine and the Great War

When Britain entered the First World War on 4th August 1914, joining France and the Russian Empire - the Allies - against the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary, The Burlington Magazine had been published continuously, and successfully, for eleven years and it had already experienced an eventful history. Luxuriously produced with many photographic reproductions … Continue reading The Burlington Magazine and the Great War

Charles Ricketts as art critic for The Burlington Magazine

Between 1904 and 1909 Charles Ricketts wrote twenty articles for The Burlington Magazine. He began in June 1904 with a brief, dismissive review of a book on Velazquez by W. Wilberforce and A.R. Gilbert, to conclude in 1909 with a long eulogy in memory of his recently deceased friend, the painter Charles Conder. These two … Continue reading Charles Ricketts as art critic for The Burlington Magazine

Francis Howard (1874-1954) and the ‘other’ Grosvenor Gallery (founded 1912)

Given names of art galleries are very important. They may refer to their holdings (the Spanish Gallery, that dealt in old masters from this country), their geographical location (the Sackville Gallery, in Sackville Street), or hint to some culturally shared concept (the Carfax Gallery, founded by Oxford university students, who referred to a monument in … Continue reading Francis Howard (1874-1954) and the ‘other’ Grosvenor Gallery (founded 1912)