‘Painting by numbers’, a statistical approach to The Burlington Magazine 1903-2016. Part I: Titian, Leonardo, Caravaggio, Cezanne and Reynolds

by Barbara Pezzini The Burlington Index is a flexible research tool. It can be simply used as a reference finder, to seek for articles, but it can also be interrogated through statistical methods, to gain a broader idea of the historical development of the Magazine itself. Which artists are more fully covered in the Burlington and … Continue reading ‘Painting by numbers’, a statistical approach to The Burlington Magazine 1903-2016. Part I: Titian, Leonardo, Caravaggio, Cezanne and Reynolds

‘Caravaggiomania’ in The Burlington Magazine, part II: 1903-1951

by Noti Klagka  This blog focuses on articles published on Caravaggio in The Burlington Magazine before the 1951 Milan exhibition organized by Roberto Longhi, which transformed Caravaggio studies. As illustrated in the previous blog, during the second half of the twentieth century, the Burlington contributed much to the shaping of Caravaggio’s oeuvre by paying close … Continue reading ‘Caravaggiomania’ in The Burlington Magazine, part II: 1903-1951

‘Caravaggiomania’ in The Burlington Magazine – Part I: the late 20th century

by Noti Klagka This post explores the scholarship on Michelangelo da Caravaggio in the pages of The Burlington Magazine and reveals the crucial role played by the Magazine in the critical reception of this artist. Caravaggio has definitely been the most popular 17th century Italian artist published in the Burlington: 59 main articles and 210 … Continue reading ‘Caravaggiomania’ in The Burlington Magazine – Part I: the late 20th century

Sense and Sensibility: Roger Fry on Caravaggio and Futurism

In October 1922, Roger Fry published in The Burlington Magazine an article-review on seventeenth century art and architecture entitled, in error, ‘Settecentismo’.[1] The article was a vigorous attack against the art of this period, it focused mainly on Caravaggio and those who, according to Fry, ‘went a- whoring, following the new idol.’[2] Fry’s text, although … Continue reading Sense and Sensibility: Roger Fry on Caravaggio and Futurism