‘Art Celebrities’, an exhibition by Cicely Hey advertised in The Burlington Magazine

Starting from an apparently innocuous 1933 advertisement in The Burlington Magazine, Index Assistant Alison Bennett has uncovered much new material about Cicely Hey, a little-known British artist of the early 20th century. Here is where her research has been taking Alison so far. In March 1933 The Burlington Magazine published an advertisement for an exhibition … Continue reading ‘Art Celebrities’, an exhibition by Cicely Hey advertised in The Burlington Magazine

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‘I’ll give the magazine £100 and you can do what you dam [sic] well please with it’, Lockett Agnew advertises in The Burlington Magazine

In its years of operation as an independently funded publication the Burlington has often needed to seek private sponsorship, right from the times of its inception in 1903 and throughout its history.[1] The challenge was, then as now, how to gain financial support without relinquishing the journal’s intellectual independence. The Burlington (which has run as Charitable … Continue reading ‘I’ll give the magazine £100 and you can do what you dam [sic] well please with it’, Lockett Agnew advertises in The Burlington Magazine

New digitisation project: the Agnew’s stock books

As the Burlington Magazine project of cataloguing and indexing dealers advertisements is well under way, we are pleased to hear that other projects flourish too. We have received this communication from Richard Wragg, Archivist at the National Gallery, and we are happy to share it with our readers: The National Gallery has recently digitised eleven … Continue reading New digitisation project: the Agnew’s stock books

Record prices, bargain sales and the complications of dealing with Duveen: the early 20th century history of art dealers Dowdeswell’s in the pages of The Burlington Magazine

The advertisements that Dowdeswell’s published in The Burlington Magazine throughout the first two decades of the 20th century are a significant, and until now, untapped resource. Not only do they enable us to position this leading gallery within the trade surrounding the sale of old masters, but they also make it possible to demonstrate why … Continue reading Record prices, bargain sales and the complications of dealing with Duveen: the early 20th century history of art dealers Dowdeswell’s in the pages of The Burlington Magazine

Anarchy and art dealing in Paris: Robert Dell (1865-1940), first Editor of The Burlington Magazine.

Roger Fry is famously associated with the inception of The Burlington Magazine, but credit must also be given to its first Editor, Robert Dell [photographed here]. A Christian socialist writer in London, then Anarchist art dealer in Paris, and finally exiled political journalist in America, Dell’s life was lived outside a conventional professional path and … Continue reading Anarchy and art dealing in Paris: Robert Dell (1865-1940), first Editor of The Burlington Magazine.

Conference Report: Friend or Foe: Art and the Market in the Nineteenth Century (The Hague, May 21-22, 2015)

Last month the Burlington Index Project was presented by the Index Editor to a distinguished audience, the conference Friend or Foe: Art and the Market in the Nineteenth Century (The Hague, May 21-22, 2015).  The Burlington Index Blog received a report on the conference by one of its organisers, Dr. Jan Dirk Baetens, and, as … Continue reading Conference Report: Friend or Foe: Art and the Market in the Nineteenth Century (The Hague, May 21-22, 2015)

Lucia Moholy. Photographer, art critic and reviewer for The Burlington Magazine (1962-1979)

Photographer Lucia Moholy was born Lucia Schulz on 18 January 1894 in Prague, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Moholy’s background and first career was as art historian and writer: she studied philosophy, philology and art history, and she worked as an editor and lecturer in Prague. In 1920 she met the Hungarian artist László … Continue reading Lucia Moholy. Photographer, art critic and reviewer for The Burlington Magazine (1962-1979)

The Burlington Magazine as tool for the study of the art market

In the Burlington Magazine (especially in the first 50 years of its existence) there is a wealth of material to aid the study of the art market. Not only, as expected, the Old Masters paintings market, but also the trade for contemporary art, especially British. This blog post wants to show how our current digital … Continue reading The Burlington Magazine as tool for the study of the art market

Dealers’ Shops – images of developing locations and use of historic premises

Another very interesting post on exteriors of antique dealers’ shops from the antiquedealers blog.

antiquedealersblog

Our database of images of Antique Dealer shops continues to grow. In the previous post I directed attention to the significances of the changing interior display of dealerships, and in the present post I thought it would be interesting to focus on exterior views and the range of buildings used by the trade; and to direct attention to the significance of the changing locations adopted by the trade over the course of the 20th century…..and some interesting aspects are evident – one is the growth of the ‘Country Antique Shop’.

In my earlier research into the history of the antique and curiosity trade (see publications in my research profile if you’re interested!) I made an observation that in the 19th century the emergence of the antique shop appears to have been almost exclusively an urban phenomenon, and that the ‘country antique shop’ was a later (20th century) development in the…

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Francis Howard (1874-1954) and the ‘other’ Grosvenor Gallery (founded 1912)

Given names of art galleries are very important. They may refer to their holdings (the Spanish Gallery, that dealt in old masters from this country), their geographical location (the Sackville Gallery, in Sackville Street), or hint to some culturally shared concept (the Carfax Gallery, founded by Oxford university students, who referred to a monument in … Continue reading Francis Howard (1874-1954) and the ‘other’ Grosvenor Gallery (founded 1912)